3 Things to Know About the Nevada Democratic Debate

The Democrats were gloves-off in a city known for prize fights, the Las Vegas!

And there was a new player in the town, who took a lot of incoming – Former NY Mayor, Michael Bloomberg, who spent more than $300 million on ads to promote his profile!

He qualified for the match just the day before after a NewsHour/Marist NPR/PBS poll became the fourth national survey presenting him with 10% or more stake in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Here’re top 3 takeaways from the debate…

  1. Bloomberg got the spotlight but had an odd performance

All that dollars Bloomberg spend on his profile and a slot on the debate platform. But he had a spotty debate.

Bloomberg enjoyed his good times– talking about how to beat President Trump, why Bernie Sanders, Vermont Sen, in his view, would fail and supporting capitalism against socialism.

“What a wonderful country we have,” Bloomberg says before taking aim at Sanders. “The well-known socialists in the country appear to be a millionaires with three houses. What did I miss here?”

But Bloomberg aged 78, hasn’t fought 11 years, and it showed. He was off the track now and again and had a tough time defending himself, especially when it comes to his past comments about women and non-disclosure agreements with some of his associates.

  1. The most aggressive woman was Warren who didn’t actually accomplish anything

Elizabeth Warren led her way with everyone. She struggled on women with Bloomberg but said voting for Sanders was like “gambling on a narrow vision” and “gambling on a revolution that will miss many of the nationals.”

She pointed at former Vice President Joe Biden and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobucher of was too “eager to be liked” by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell; and Warren claimed that former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg “has been taking money from big donors and changing his positions.”

  1. The centrists are not showing unity

It’s now clear that Buttigieg and Klobuchar either don’t favour each other very much or at least get under each other’s skin. Buttigieg had a strong war, for the most times, but not when going after Klobuchar for not getting the name of Mexico’s president right during a candidate forum.

Every rival sees the other as a threat. Nevada may be winnowing process for both. Buttigieg is the overall representative leader after solid shows in Iowa and New Hampshire. Klobuchar got a lot of force pulling out a shock third-place finish in New Hampshire.

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